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Extreme Glamping & Lolligag | Tettegouche SP | February 2022

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  • Extreme Glamping & Lolligag | Tettegouche SP | February 2022

    This may not be fit for this forum given the extreme level of lolligag and unapologetic glamping. However, we've had such little snow here this winter (just traces at a time) that getting out for some backcountry hot tenting trips locally has been a no-go. Combine that with a perpetually extremely high fire danger, and we decided around Christmas to book a last-minute trip up to the cabin camp at Tettegouche State Park. We've done this trip several times and love the easy rhythm of it, despite the 8 hour drive to Duluth. This time we tucked away for four days in a lakeside cabin with a night in our favorite hotel on the canal in Duluth a night either side. Temps were super moderate (5-30F) but the snow was perfect, and 2 feet of it at that. I almost didn't shoot any footage this trip, but grabbed the camera last minute and cobbled together a little project. It's ironic that as I write this, we're finally getting some snow and wintery temps with -20F wind chills and dropping.

    Last edited by 4estTrekker; 02-23-2022, 01:27 PM.

  • #2
    Here's a series of quick iPhone shots. I really do love my short little toboggan I built from a blank from Chris at Black River Sleds. Combined with a backpack, it's exactly what I need since I don't have a Snowtrekker and larger stove (yet). Glad I brought my anorak, as we did have a couple days of some pretty stiff wind. I was comfortable with just a sweater underneath.

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    Last edited by 4estTrekker; 02-22-2022, 09:01 AM.

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    • #3
      Great little video of your trip. I love cabins and that looked so relaxing. On a side note I consider myself to be a decent sharpener of all blades, but I can't sharpener a crooked knife to save my life! Always wanted to make a kuksa, did you make it on this trip or just wood spoons?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Midwest Firecraft View Post
        Great little video of your trip. I love cabins and that looked so relaxing.
        It was indeed relaxing. Just had to haul wood from the pile to the cabin, but it was already split and seasoned maple. Water was had from the hand pump a short distance away and is some of the best water I've ever tasted. Such luxuries make it hard to put the snowshoes on and hit the trail before it's already time for supper. Oh, and then there's the heated shower house with flushers and hot showers. I mean, c'mon. I live more barbaric in the comfort of my own home.

        Originally posted by Midwest Firecraft View Post
        Great little video of your trip. I love cabins and that looked so relaxing. On a side note I consider myself to be a decent sharpener of all blades, but I can't sharpener a crooked knife to save my life! Always wanted to make a kuksa, did you make it on this trip or just wood spoons?
        Yeah, they're a little different animal to sharpen, huh? I didn't do much carving on the trip, as that was another member of our crew in the shot who also carves. As for the kuksa, we all carry ones made by the Finnish company Kupilka. They're a unique blend of 50% wood fiber and 50% thermoplastic, which they call their Kareline® natural fiber composite. Pretty cool products.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by 4estTrekker View Post
          As for the kuksa, we all carry ones made by the Finnish company Kupilka. They're a unique blend of 50% wood fiber and 50% thermoplastic, which they call their Kareline® natural fiber composite. Pretty cool products.
          I think that's a great idea, as the people I have seen with all wood ones have them crack and leak. I have no idea if they oiled and maintained them, but non the less they cracked while camping.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Midwest Firecraft View Post
            I think that's a great idea, as the people I have seen with all wood ones have them crack and leak. I have no idea if they oiled and maintained them, but non the less they cracked while camping.
            Yeah, we're pretty hard on ours and they're going strong three and four years later. I do have a wooden kuksa that has just finally dried long enough to finish carve that might squeak its way into a late season trip, though.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Midwest Firecraft View Post
              I think that's a great idea, as the people I have seen with all wood ones have them crack and leak. I have no idea if they oiled and maintained them, but non the less they cracked while camping.
              I am using few kuksas I made for many years. non of them cracked. even after drinking hot drinks in freezing weather. I carve green wood (usually burls) and boil it in very salted water for 2-3 hours ( for 4L water - about 100g coarse salt) after cup is completed I finish it with raw flaxseed oil applying few layers and let cure for a few days between

              4rest trekker sorry for hijack your topic. great trip indeed
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              • #8
                Originally posted by kiggy View Post

                I am using few kuksas I made for many years. non of them cracked. even after drinking hot drinks in freezing weather. I carve green wood (usually burls) and boil it in very salted water for 2-3 hours ( for 4L water - about 100g coarse salt) after cup is completed I finish it with raw flaxseed oil applying few layers and let cure for a few days between
                That's great to hear. Looks beautiful!

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