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  • Budget Stove/Tent combo

    [B]UPDATE[/B]: modifying this somewhat based on the responses I've been getting.
    Let me rephrase: Are there any decent. hot-tent/stove combos out there that would suit 1-2 people but can be had for less than 1000.00 CAD?? So far everything I've found seems to be around 1500.00 or more once the currency exchange is factored in.

    [B]Original Post:[/B]
    I've been dying to try winter camping for a long time now but have hesitated because the price of hot tent/stove combos is a little steep considering it might only get one or two uses a year.
    What's the best dollar value in stove/hot tent combo out there?
    Also hot tent/stove combos seem outrageously heavy is there a good compromise between weight/price?

    This would be for 1-2 people max. Not looking for a big crowd..
    Last edited by Hiking Quest; 11-09-2020, 10:41 AM.

  • #2
    Best budget option would be one of the nylon hot tents paired with a Knico stove, switch out the std pipe with a roll up titanium pipe if you want to save some weight. If you can sew then your options open up a bit look for a suitable tent that can be pitched fly only, add a stove jack and snow flaps and you have a tent. Some of the 10ozcanvas tent heavy stoves are ridiculously heavy but fine if you are camping straight from the car or snowmobile. Otherwise for two folk a 40lb combo of tent and stove is fine if you are pulling a toboggan on flat terrain.

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    • #3
      Sorry, I don’t have a specific recommendation. There are many different ways to go and price is just one of the variables between tents and stoves. I’ve found converting nylon tents to hot tents to be the most budget friendly option if you have a little time and a sewing machine.

      If purchasing new, Like most sports, budget gear is not necessary the gear you will want in the long run if you stick with the activity. Your post says you looking to “try” winter camping. There are many ways to get out there without spending a fortune while you figure out what you really want/need. These include cold camping with gear on-hand, borrowing, renting or tagging along on a trip with a hot tent owner.

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      • #4
        Another option if you wish to try winter camping, is to find a group running a course on winter camping in your area. The cheapest way to get started winter camping, presuming you live in snow country is to build a quinzhee shelter. This will allow you to use your existing 3 season gear with a bit of supplementation of blankets or sleeping bag liners.

        For hot tenting on the cheap, if you have some DIY skills you can search youtube for any of the various methods of making a hot tent from a hardware store tarp. Lonnie at Far North Bushcraft and survival has a series on making a tipi style hot tent and another on making a wood stove from HVAC duct pipe.

        Cheers

        Brian

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        • #5
          For ideas check Wawhiker or CamperChristina.com on Youtube for hot tent cheap builds.
          For entry woodstove check out Great West Metal ...$100cdn plus pipe and your running [url]https://www.greatwestmetal.ca/products/sheet-iron-camp-stoves[/url] (when in stock)
          Like Brian says if your not sure and can tag along with a group dive in... Guess from that is what area are you in and maybe someone can get you hands on with their gear to steer you in your right direction. In the end Do what's right for you and enjoy!!

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          • #6
            Thanks for the responses - going to clarify because I wasn't really clear
            1. I don't have a sewing machine or the skill/time to start sewing/converting a nylon tent - let's leave that option for now
            2. I live in Ontario GTA so about a couple hours south of Alqonquin and beyond.
            3. I have thought about renting gear but the price to rent a hot tent and stove for a long weekend seems outrageous.
            4. I realize that you have to pay for quality gear - I have never cheaped out on gear and don't recommend it. Conversely I have sometimes overpaid for performance on gear that gets used only occasionally - there has to be a balance.
            5. Most of the hot-tent stove combos I've looked at come to minium 1500 CAD (after factoring in USD conversion) so I guess my original question shoul have been
            "Is there a hot tent/stove combination that can be had for 1-2 person camping that costs less than 1000 CAD all in?

            As for cold camping and quinzes etc. I have the gear to go cold camping but when talking to people who have done both the consensus has been that hot tenting is the way to go. To be truthful part of me feels that cold-camping is a lot simpler (I mean that's all that mountaineers do) But the two seem so different that I can't see how one would give me any appreciation for the other.

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            • #7
              This
              [URL]https://www.amazon.ca/OneTigris-Shield-Bushcraft-Poles-Weighs/dp/B08D7M376N?pd_rd_w=mtu2W&pf_rd_p=58314bfe-c2ce-4496-af47-1224572bbb23&pf_rd_r=Z5Y8WPNH4E1A0S92045R&pd_rd_r=679afc03-20fd-4151-988d-987cf9726d3a&pd_rd_wg=yAGTL[/URL]

              or if you want something brand name there is the MSR front Range pyramid or Black Diamond Megalight

              plus a Knico from Canadian Outdoor Equipment, probably the Alaskan Juniior. [URL]https://www.canadianoutdoorequipment.com/kni-co-alaskan-jr-for-esker-tents-stove.html[/URL]
              Though as they are out of stock you could also take a look on ebay or amazon as well.

              If you can't find anyone to sew a stove jack for you locally I can sew one in for you for $50 including the cost of the silicon heatproof material. I think the best place for it would be the middle of the back wall though others may have a different opinion.

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              • #8
                [QUOTE=Bothwell Voyageur;n1035]


                If you can't find anyone to sew a stove jack for you locally I can sew one in for you for $50 including the cost of the silicon heatproof material. I think the best place for it would be the middle of the back wall though others may have a different opinion.[/QUOTE]

                Thanks for the offer I might take you up on that.
                Just noticed this one [url]https://www.pomoly.com/HEX-Solo-Canvas-Hot-Tent-with-Wood-Stove-Jack-1-2-Person-p1153955.html[/url]
                Don't know if anyone has any exp with this brand. But the price is right. ...

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                • #9
                  Hi HQ,
                  I respect your approach of choosing wisely AND cheaply to start. I did it this way and have had success building the equipment bundle.

                  When you start with very basic, but functional equipment without too many big compromises, then very quickly you'll find the items that, if upgraded, will give you the most satisfaction. Then you are on your way!

                  Weight is always a problem (obsession?) but "heavy" is a relative thing, and loads can be split for the short steel uphills. Function is much more important.

                  On a short trip upstream from Mississippi SK many years ago a trapper on his way to Stanley stopped his snow machine to warm up. He needed a cup of tea while his parka dried out and he could not have cared less that our shelter looked like a multi-coloured ugly Christmas sweater contest winner or that our stove was an old 18 inch airtight with bent legs and rusty pipe.

                  We called him in, he took one look at us sitting in shirt sleeves in January and his face shifted from half frozen frost-covered angles to one huge round smile!

                  The makeshift tent was snug, the stove had patches of cherry red on the sides, and the split wood pile was big. He found heat and laughter and about 6 cups of sweet tea; That was an excellent set up from his view, simple as that.

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                  • #10
                    [QUOTE=Hiking Quest;n1036]

                    Thanks for the offer I might take you up on that.
                    Just noticed this one [url]https://www.pomoly.com/HEX-Solo-Canvas-Hot-Tent-with-Wood-Stove-Jack-1-2-Person-p1153955.html[/url]
                    Don't know if anyone has any exp with this brand. But the price is right. ... [/QUOTE]
                    That pomoly tent will be fine I’m sure. It wouldn’t be my first option as I think small hex tents waste a lot of space as the side length is shorter than a mat length so trying to optimize sleeping position is difficult. You are already limited by the slope of the walls. A camper on a three inch thick pad in a thick winter bag needs a lot of headroom. This works in big tents where you can move out from the sides a bit, smaller tents not so much.
                    plus they have that stove jack cover that rolls up above the pipe, and completely subjectively I think they’re ugly!

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                    • #11
                      Lonewolf 902 on youtube is giving away some pomoly tent and stove setups if you or anyone wants to try there luck

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                      • #12
                        [QUOTE=Bkrgi;n1041]Lonewolf 902 on youtube is giving away some pomoly tent and stove setups if you or anyone wants to try there luck[/QUOTE]

                        I've been squinting at pictures for an hour with no luck!

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                        • #13
                          [QUOTE=Hiking Quest;n1042]

                          I've been squinting at pictures for an hour with no luck![/QUOTE]

                          The hot tent and stove offerings from Pomoly will fit into your budget. Look at the HEX Plus Canvas Hot Tent and one of their titanium backpacking stoves.

                          Cheers

                          Brian

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                          • #14
                            nothing wrong with cold camping. dress properly, have good eat, stay hydrated. good ground insulation and double bag system. make big fire and enjoy the outdoors
                            mec renting 4 seasons bags/pads if you don't have own.

                            another option is rent hot tent [url]https://www.snowtrekkertents.com/tent-rentals/[/url]
                            $75 CAD for day for tent/stove combo
                            Algonquin has yurts for rent as well, just to get an idea if you like winter camping

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                            • #15
                              My budget build was an older used canvas tent and a homemade stove.

                              However times are changing. many are going straight to pop up ice shantys with a wood stove. Kni-co seems to be the ticket for price.

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