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  • Roll up stove pipe rings

    I am trying a new stove this year with a roll up pipe. It comes with a fair number of rings and I plan to make a few spare but I would rather avoid losing them.

    What are others experience? Is losing them just not a big problem? I could see them dropping into the snow forever.

    My plan right now is to put them on some sort of clip/caribiner to keep track of the ones not in use. Is there some other strategy I should be considering?

  • #2
    I have my spares held together with a little piece of Orange UST Gear Snake.
    Which is a piece of soft tie wire covered in some sort of orange silicone rubber stuff, it keeps them more visible.
    The ones I plan on using I just slip onto the rolled up pipe, which fits inside my current stove.

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    • #3
      I've found that the rings definitely disappear when you are not looking - sometimes even when you are!
      The only response I've used is similar to what you are already planning timdaman. I, too, use a small carabiner to collect and hold on to the wire rings and one of the circular bands. The only way I have been successful if by being extra careful and focused each time I am handling them. I avoid assembling the pipe in the dark, or when I am cold (and therefore less attentive).
      A few people have added bright tabs to each wire ring. This works so long as you arrange the bright tab to be over the external edge of the rolled pipe metal so that it is suspended over the coolest part of the pipe - otherwise, just as you envision, it'll melt onto your pipe, or burn - neither option is a good one!
      Enjoy your super-light-weight stove pipe!

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      • #4
        I will be using quick release hose clamps for my roll-up pipe this year. I do take a weight penalty for them, but they are less likely to get lost.
        https://www.amazon.com/QR-36-Caesar-.../dp/B01BU8YZPG

        I have the new "Stoke and Screw" which will help with adjustments. It is an alternative to the "Stoke and Blow"

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        • #5
          Originally posted by MRaske View Post
          I will be using quick release hose clamps for my roll-up pipe this year. I do take a weight penalty for them, but they are less likely to get lost.
          https://www.amazon.com/QR-36-Caesar-.../dp/B01BU8YZPG

          I have the new "Stoke and Screw" which will help with adjustments. It is an alternative to the "Stoke and Blow"
          I wonder how they will slide along the pipe when setting up. The wire loops are flexible and quite forgiving if they are not quite straight on the pipe. I have also found they can be "rolled" up the pipe to get them tight up to the inner ring at the top.

          I keep mine in a tuna can inside the stove. I set the welding blanket that I use under the stove first then tip them on to there before setting up the pipe. So far so good!

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          • #6
            I will let you know. I have only burned the stove and pipe once so far because winter does not seem to want to be apart of the last portion of 2020. I am hoping that they will help push the stove jack away from the stove a little too.

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            • #7
              MRaske,
              maybe I am showing my age but what is "Stoke and Screw" and "Stoke and Blow". They sound like a lot of fun but I suspect we are not thinking of the same thing.

              Thanks for mentioning those clamps. That would be the perfect thing to make the connection between my roll-up pipe and stove firm, I am going to see if I can find one of those in Canada.

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              • #8
                I make my own rings utilizing stainless bicycle brake cable and ferrules I purchased on mcmaster carr. I keep a couple extra in my stove bag. I've yet to lose any.

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                • #9
                  I will have to get you some pictures! But, a Stoke and Blow is a tube that you can blow through to help get your fire burning. It also has a crimped end that you can rake your coals to the center and front of the stove. A Stoke and Screw is a similar device only a metal rod instead of a tube that has a bent and forge flattened end for raking coals and the other side has a flat screw for the pipe rings. Someday, perhaps Maruska Metal Works will come up with a Stoke, Blow AND Screw which would of course change the entire sport of winter camping

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                  • #10
                    Undersky had some made up with a washer welded in to the screw slot. No need for tools.

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