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  • Stove Pipe Set-Ups

    Anyone willing to share any innovative ways they've set up the support for their stove pipes? I bought a Four Dog TI 2 at the symposium and am just starting to play around with how I'll be using and setting it up. I remember somebody (maybe Ryan Fox?) had a pretty cool set up that didn't require a bipod.

    Cheers
    Last edited by Srobocop0615; 11-16-2021, 01:53 PM.

  • #2
    Photo of my pipe on a recent tent conversion. The ropes are attached to the pipe with a caribiner and a modified hose clamp. Also, I welded a wing nut to the hose clamp screw to make it easier to tighten to the pipe.

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    • #3
      I haven't used one of the FourDog stoves before but if I am right the pipes are about 20" long and the damper is roughly in the middle or about 10" above the stove. That is very nice, my baffles are at the bottom of the pipe so always right next to the hot stove top when I want to use them.

      I am not sure if you have ever used a hot tent setup before, apologies if I am making a wrong assumption but I want to make sure you don't have a fire. I assume you will are talking about your pipe vertically rising through a stove jack in a slanted roof line. If you can post picture or info on the brand and model of tent that would help.

      I am not as experienced as some of the others in this forum, they may have better advise, but in my setup I aim for more than 1' of space above and around, usually about 2'. The roof on my pyramid comes in about 20" above the top of the stove and it gets uncomfortably hot so I have a heat shield for it. If your roof is less than 10" away from the roof I would be nervous about lighting it on fire.

      I personally never tie supports on my pipe. I run straight pipes up. The pipe is supported on the bottom by the stove and about 20" up by the stove jack. I set up in sheltered areas and when pitch my pyramid I always ensure the wall with the stove is placed in a location where I can give it the best tie outs. It has never been a problem or even close call for me but I might have gotten lucky.

      I have seen elbows used for a first section before though the idea makes me a bit nervous.

      TLDR: If you can not get the damper inside the tent I think you need to move the stove to where there more room.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by timdaman View Post
        I haven't used one of the FourDog stoves before but if I am right the pipes are about 20" long and the damper is roughly in the middle or about 10" above the stove. That is very nice, my baffles are at the bottom of the pipe so always right next to the hot stove top when I want to use them.

        I am not sure if you have ever used a hot tent setup before, apologies if I am making a wrong assumption but I want to make sure you don't have a fire. I assume you will are talking about your pipe vertically rising through a stove jack in a slanted roof line. If you can post picture or info on the brand and model of tent that would help.

        I am not as experienced as some of the others in this forum, they may have better advise, but in my setup I aim for more than 1' of space above and around, usually about 2'. The roof on my pyramid comes in about 20" above the top of the stove and it gets uncomfortably hot so I have a heat shield for it. If your roof is less than 10" away from the roof I would be nervous about lighting it on fire.

        I personally never tie supports on my pipe. I run straight pipes up. The pipe is supported on the bottom by the stove and about 20" up by the stove jack. I set up in sheltered areas and when pitch my pyramid I always ensure the wall with the stove is placed in a location where I can give it the best tie outs. It has never been a problem or even close call for me but I might have gotten lucky.

        I have seen elbows used for a first section before though the idea makes me a bit nervous.

        TLDR: If you can not get the damper inside the tent I think you need to move the stove to where there more room.
        I have a 9.5 x 11 Snowtrekker Shortwall. I've had a few snowtrekkers in the past, a minimalist and a 8 x 10 crew, but it's been a few years.

        I think I'll have to use a elbow right out of the stove in order to get the pipe out of the stove jack. The damper is in the top of that first section of pipe, about 80% the way up. Which is why I'm nervous the damper might end up outside of the tent. If the damper was in the middle of lower end of that first section of pipe I'd have more room to experiment. Currently, if I give the stove 2 ft of clearance from the wall, it will probably just barely stay inside of the tent. I'd prefer to stay around 18in of clearance if I can get away with it. I'm hoping to play around with it tonight. He did include two elbows tho, so I'm looking forward to playing around with whether I want to double 45 the pipe back to vertical.

        Thanks for the input! I'll definitely keep it in mine when playing around with it tonight

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Snowbound View Post
          Photo of my pipe on a recent tent conversion. The ropes are attached to the pipe with a caribiner and a modified hose clamp. Also, I welded a wing nut to the hose clamp screw to make it easier to tighten to the pipe.
          hose clamps, carabiners, and wing nuts! I like it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Snowbound,
            that is a neat setup, very clever.


            Srobocop0615,
            gotcha, I know that tent, it was the first one I ever used(a rental). If I remember the jack is rather low near the entrance. When I used it I think I might have dug out the inside area a bit which allowed me to install the first section of the KniCo pipe before then adding a elbow. I think starting out with a elbow, then your damper section is going to be a must to get everything is a good place if you don't modify the kit or dig out. Looking at photos it looks to be a common practice so I support I should get over my nerves. That of course then means you need some sort of support which was you original question. There I think Snowbound may be on to something. With the lower exit I think you can get away with a shorter pipe as the sparks wont be literally raining down from above.

            Comment


            • #7
              I picked up a used 4Dog last winter. The previous owner had riveted a plate over the damper slot and made up a short piece of pipe with a traditional damper. This fits to the stove first, then the elbow and then the first section of pipe.

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              • #8
                for years all I've done is take a length of aircraft cable, attach a pair of spring clamps, wrap it around a joint (the flange keeps it from slipping) and clip the two clamps to the tent roof seam about 1 1/2- 2' apart, you can adjust the tension by adding extra wraps or moving the clamps. I added a pair of canvas tabs to the seam on my latest tent to stop wear on the seam

                Comment


                • timdaman
                  timdaman commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I assume you are in a A frame if you can put the clamps that far apart. Neat idea. Do you have a rope pulling "down" as well or are you relying on the weight of the pipe to counter the upward forces?

              • #9
                Like others have mentioned, I do something similar with the ropes. I have a snowtrekker. Around the stove pipe I have a pipe clamp that has three metal loops attached to it that has three quick clamps. On the tent itself, I have tied three ropes on the outside: one on the peak above the door, and the other two on the bottom two points on the wall of the pipe hole. These three ropes I then tie to the pipe clamp clamps and synch them up using a taut-line hitch. When the ropes are all tied and snug and pulling against each other, that pipe doesn't go anywhere. I have had it is some pretty big winds and there is no movement from that pipe, as long as the tent is secured well.

                For a brief time I would harvest two long wood poles/branches and lash them to the pipe with wire, but that was just another thing I had to find out in the bush. It has been very nice since going to this method, and I have to credit TG (Rich) for posting the idea years ago.

                I hope that is a good explanation. I could dig up some pictures if you need.

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                • #10
                  timdaman, yes it's an a- frame, the pipe needs no downwards pressure because the wire ends up virtually horizontal, it's there for stability not weight- bearing. The weight is carried solely by the joints, but because there are elbows they tend to rotate without some sort of support

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                  • #11
                    I use a hose clamp for a clothes dryer. They're stainless and have a large plastic wing nut that is yellow (has never melted) with three pieces of aluminum angle riveted to the clamp at 120 degrees apart. I use clips and guyline to position the pipe.

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      Originally posted by Bothwell Voyageur View Post
                      I picked up a used 4Dog last winter. The previous owner had riveted a plate over the damper slot and made up a short piece of pipe with a traditional damper. This fits to the stove first, then the elbow and then the first section of pipe.
                      I have to do something similar because that damper slot is outside of my tent when it's set up. I don't understand why he would cut that slot so high in the first pipe (it's 8/10ths of the way up the pipe).

                      I'll definitely have to play around and find some hose clamps and rope/cord/wire. That seems like a nice way to go with it. I like the idea of not having to find long sticks for support.

                      Thank you for all the replies guys!

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