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Favorite Anorak?

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  • #16
    2-3 garments is a beautiful pace when they are as labor intensive as mine.

    That's the balance I need right now. Nothing is worth compromising that this year.

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    • #17
      Empire Canvas Anorak with a Coyote ruff that I supplied, then a Snowshoe hare in oilcloth for transition/ shoulder seasons. Also a beater Swedish military anorak that I improved the arm pits to actually make it comfortable.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Piolet View Post
        Haggis,
        I'm leaning towards getting their parka, but they're making it difficult. They claim to be "Craftsman" but then caveat their website with disclaimers about not presently selling anything but their stock items, when they're in stock. It seems they've turned into a "merchandiser" vice a "craftsman" (Like so many others that found more profit in stopping one-off work and only selling mass-produced gear in "take-it-or-leave-it" configurations.) Oh well!
        There is a reason ECW is the gold standard for the gear that they do produce... and waiting is part of the process... it requires some planning and some patience... and this is a special year for so many other things... so not to worry. When you do get lucky and get on their production schedule for the item or items you desire; the rewards are worthwhile and considerable and the durability and 'goodness' of the garments are easily and quickly recognized and appreciated.
        I went through that process for many months but had plenty of questions answered and reassurances made along the way by Kevin, the owner.
        No regrets, ever. Patience is rewarded.

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        • #19
          Has anyone ever used a garment like this one? Perhaps it could be called a "hooded cape".
          https://www.google.com/search?q=rein...E6IZyxLQw4faPM
          I wonder how useful it would be for tromping under/past/through snow-laden conifer branches?
          As well, for me a lot of heat is lost through shoulders, neck and head, so it may function effectively as a insulating layer too.

          Anyone ever try this garment?
          I'd appreciate your comments, thanks!

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          • #20
            The "Luhkka" ?
            If an insulated poncho works well enough I can't see why a hooded cape like the luhkka wouldn't work just as well and would be less likely to get in the way. A modern interpretation using a windproof shell and synthetic insulation cut longer in the back would add a lot of comfort around camp.
            My own insulated poncho has been set aside as I used too much insulation and it was far too warm, using 200GSM doona wadding if that helps any

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            • #21
              Agreed, Moondog55.
              In his book Northern Nurse, Merrick mentions the Labrador trappers using wide knitted scarves as hats, scarves, and capes, or belts, depending upon the weather.
              Perhaps an outer cape of water-resistant (but not water-proof) material with an insulated removable liner would work best? Having a longer back might allow it to drape comfortably over a moderately-sized daypack, also. Who needs snow falling between your pack and your back?!!

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              • #22
                I believe Southcove uses a woollen blanket inside one of the German snow camp ponchos, actually where I got my idea from.
                Last edited by Moondog55; 01-21-2021, 07:29 PM. Reason: spelling mistake corrected

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                • #23
                  I hope to make a relatively short version of a luhkka (cut off at my elbows in the front and a little longer at the back) that will be breathable with no insulation. I'll post how I find that it works. If a bit of insulation is a good idea, than I think I'd try to have an insulation layer that is removable both for easier drying, and to keep the garment combinations more versatile.

                  Has anyone worn one of these?

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                  • #24
                    Hey Undersky, haven't worn it, but had read of some version of it used by natives in Siberia
                    made from leather or wool check the pics
                    second pic is inside pouches
                    Click image for larger version

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                    • #25
                      Empire Wool and Canvas, Arctic Anorak! Just like it is advertised, lol , like wearing a body sized tent.

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                      • #26
                        Yup, it's roomy alright - although trying one on in August isn't nearly the same experience as stepping out of a shelter in mid-January fully outfitted with mukluks, wool pants, wool top layers and the EWC anorak over everything. That "tent" keeps everything underneath warm, dry, and cozy while permitting ease of movement when ice fishing or moving through brush. It was a winter game-changer for me the last couple years. Here's a toast to frigid weather!

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                        • #27


                          Over here there are no real suppliers of Anorak / Parkas so I had to make my own.

                          Based very roughly on the Conover pattern crossed with a Viking tunic for simplicity.

                          I made it reversible with a green Ventile inner / outer layer so it would be more useful in our wet winter conditions when needed.

                          Since this picture I have replaced the fox fur ruff with a coyote one which works a bit better.

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