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  • Wayland
    replied
    Hi Minnesotian

    Nice to know someone is out there reading stuff.

    I'm planning a Winter trip to Finland next February so hopefully I'll have something new to write about soon. That will end up on my Ice-Raven site but I'll post up here as well.

    It's sad that Mors has taken the final trail now, he was quite a character and a deep well of knowledge. Great loss.

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  • Minnesotian
    commented on 's reply
    Wayland, I am pleased you are a member of this forum. I came across your blog Ravenlore, many years ago and read almost everything there. My favorite thing I came across was the explanation of The Kochanski Flip Flop Winch. I wish I was in Scotland to go out camping with you.

  • Wayland
    replied
    I notice most of the people here favour hot camping. While I lack the opportunity to get out to Scandinavia more than once every couple of years, the major constraint is always the amount of baggage I can fly with which has so far led me towards cold camping and I think I actually prefer that.

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    I spent most of my first trip working out of an improvised Quinzhee cut into a mound of snow piled up on a trail head car park ( Long Story ) and I found that not making transitions from cold to heated environments was actually quite convenient. I had a spirit stove and a fire for cooking and making snowball soup so all I had to do was brush any loose snow off before approaching the fire.


    Later on that trip I was using a cotton tarp which worked OK but as we moved into a freeze thaw cycle, ended up encrusted with ice which proved a problem packing for the return flights.

    I like the open view that a tarp offers, it can be closed down in bad weather of course but as a photographer it means I can keep an eye on the sky conditions for aurora.


    This led me to move towards plastic builders tarps which, while not being very glamorous, at least do not absorb water and are cheap enough to discard before the flight home. It's easy to find a new home for such a tarp in rural communities and that leaves more baggage allowance for bringing interesting stuff home.


    This approach has evolved into the latest incarnation "The Wayland Snow Shed" which will be tested on my next planned trip to Finland in February.

    The arrangement has been tested in temperate conditions of course but not under proper snow conditions yet. The plan is to combine snow building with the prefabricated plastic tarp construction, guying off to trees and benefiting from their shelter too. Time will tell but hopefully this will be my working set up for some time to come.

    A different approach perhaps but an interesting experiment.
    Last edited by Wayland; 11-15-2021, 07:13 AM.

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  • rbinhood
    replied
    I sewed this tent last year. It is based on the tent the Conovers used in their trans-Canada trip. Made from 100% cotton pillow ticking at about 4.5 oz./yd.

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  • Moondog55
    replied
    If I remember correctly Kaifus used a large split keyring and 4 of the Eureka style pins to support a 12mm pole along each corner. A lightweight version of the standard Antarctic tent frame.

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  • empirecanvas
    replied
    Click image for larger version

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    I stole away to the wooded ridge above our neighborhood for a quiet night under the pines.

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  • kiggy
    replied
    Click image for larger version

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ID:	1751 here are some past trips. haven't got out to my traditional x-mass / new year trip as wife decided trip to Caribbean. so now I watching snow from my window in 2 weeks quarantine
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  • Coldfeet
    replied

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  • Bothwell Voyageur
    replied
    Originally posted by Mike Bechard View Post
    I think that it was Kaifus, the guy that took those long solo trips across the BWCA.
    Mike
    Thanks, his trip reports were pretty impressive

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  • Mike Bechard
    replied
    Originally posted by Bothwell Voyageur View Post
    As well as the usual Snowtrekker we also have a lightweight set-up based around an old Golite Shangila 5. I added a short wall and snow skirt to improve room around the perimeter. Stove jack position was dictated by the hole a mouse chewed in the tent one year while the tent was in storage. Undersky and I have used this on a few treks and while it’s more fussy than the Snowtrekker to set up it has been a great tent for lightweight travel. I took these pics last weekend when my wife and I camped with friends at a walk in site in Manitoba.

    Click image for larger version Name:	42EAAE76-D4C3-4CDE-A265-78D80F4203FD.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	42.6 KB ID:	839Click image for larger version Name:	D0A23371-FB6C-4E06-B85B-0376AE826776.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	28.4 KB ID:	840 Click image for larger version

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    the interior picture shows the absence of a centre pole. Instead we have an A frame rigged across the diagonal, the apex is a 1” pvc elbow. As well as opening up the middle of the tenT it helps support the side walls and makes the tent easier to pitch. I should really get around to making a full four pole set up but this works reasonably well and of course is lighter. I seem to remover someone on winter trekking had the four poles set up but I can’t remember who!
    I think that it was Kaifus, the guy that took those long solo trips across the BWCA.
    Mike

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  • Hamingredient
    replied
    Originally posted by Bothwell Voyageur View Post
    Stove jack position was dictated by the hole a mouse chewed in the tent one year while the tent was in storage.
    Hah, that's a pragmatic solution to a bothersome problem! Thank you, mister mouse!

    Leave a comment:


  • Bothwell Voyageur
    replied
    As well as the usual Snowtrekker we also have a lightweight set-up based around an old Golite Shangila 5. I added a short wall and snow skirt to improve room around the perimeter. Stove jack position was dictated by the hole a mouse chewed in the tent one year while the tent was in storage. Undersky and I have used this on a few treks and while it’s more fussy than the Snowtrekker to set up it has been a great tent for lightweight travel. I took these pics last weekend when my wife and I camped with friends at a walk in site in Manitoba.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	42EAAE76-D4C3-4CDE-A265-78D80F4203FD.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	42.6 KB ID:	839Click image for larger version  Name:	D0A23371-FB6C-4E06-B85B-0376AE826776.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	28.4 KB ID:	840 Click image for larger version

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    the interior picture shows the absence of a centre pole. Instead we have an A frame rigged across the diagonal, the apex is a 1” pvc elbow. As well as opening up the middle of the tenT it helps support the side walls and makes the tent easier to pitch. I should really get around to making a full four pole set up but this works reasonably well and of course is lighter. I seem to remover someone on winter trekking had the four poles set up but I can’t remember who!

    Leave a comment:


  • Bothwell Voyageur
    replied
    Wondered if it was an ex Federal prison uniform you bought at the surplus store.

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  • timdaman
    replied
    LOL, that color coordination was not planned but now that you mention it I suppose that is one thing that outfit have going for it. Orange is not my first choice but it was always on sale, no idea why. My wife likes the color too but that is a whole different conversation.

    If people are interested in the garments themselves the top is a Patagonia R1 Hoody and bottom is a MEC full zip pant similar to the Alpine Ally. I recommend both highly and have gotten many seasons of wear out of each thought pants are suffering greatly from saw nicks so they may be replaced if something goes on sale.

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  • Bothwell Voyageur
    replied
    Originally posted by timdaman View Post
    Thanks Brain. I noticed that too.

    The pulk packed for a 9 day solo
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    I'm almost scared to ask what you are wearing in this photo! The colour does at least match your pulk I suppose!

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