Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ti stove pipe boo boo

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ti stove pipe boo boo

    This “oops”’will cost me about $100.
    The spark arrestor has 3 clips to guyline it out. Nice, but I accidentally caught my foot on the line and it created a nice letter V. 😩. Forrest Gump said it well, stupid is what stupid does.
    I’m not to sure I will use guy lines again when I get the new pipe.
    Wonder if Winnerwell will give me a discount?

  • #2
    ...Hmm. Get a roll, and sell what you don't need.... only $155 for....*zoinks* that measurement IS in inches. Must be nice stuff.

    https://www.mcmaster.com/5747T41/
    Last edited by empirecanvas; 01-18-2021, 08:30 AM.

    Comment


    • Undersky
      Undersky commented
      Editing a comment
      Hi Empire,
      I liked your initial idea, but when I check out the site you referenced, it appears that the "roll" is only 50 inches long. Is this what you read, too?

  • #3
    Splint it with a tin can and keep using the the flue, it will probably still work just as well after splinting. Will cost you a couple of hose clips tho and the cost of a can of beans

    Comment


    • #4
      I’ve always thought guy lines was a misnomer, we should just be honest with ourselves, and call them trip lines.

      Comment


      • #5
        + 1 on the splint
        you could use a short piece of pipe instead of a tin can but the idea is the same. It may be enough to slide the wire rings down to secure it in place.
        The guy line idea is definitely a recipe for disaster. If I didn’t fall over it the dog certainly would

        Comment


        • #6
          yep! guy lines are a goner! to bad i just bought 100ft of reflective line. I like the idea of splinting things together and will try that idea for fun but I just purchased 6ft from liteoutdoors. Winnerwell never responded to two emails, I called and their material is stuck in the port which is understandable with what is going on...just wish they would have replied back, I am a customer.
          Funny how no one shows the "boo boo's" in the you tube videos, I told that to a friend who just started winter camping. i have always been honest when things go wrong especially when it's my fault. I did sleep with the knife next to me to slice open the tent just in case. I learned that from many of you folks from the other site. Best health to all. i made a promise to get into better shape so i can go on a winter trip in 2023 up north. Now I just have to reduce my mistakes and exercise more. No snow down here in the NYC area, waaaa

          Comment


          • #7
            Sadly, the guy line keeps the chimney cap in place. I've gone a-lookin for it in heavy winds a few times.

            Comment


            • #8
              The fragile nature of rolled Ti pipe is its greatest downfall and trade-off. Its light weight is absolutely wonderful, but sometimes such a delicate item is hard to rationalize on the winter trail.

              Comment


              • #9
                I think some campers are getting carried away with the length of their stove pipes, just saying...

                Comment


                • Undersky
                  Undersky commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Perhaps, but some folks like the draw that long cylinder of rising air creates, and the subsequent ability to burn sub-optimal wood....not to mention the jet turbine sound effect of combustion air being drawn in furiously!!

              • #10
                Man, I'm sorry to see that happen to ya! Glad it didn't cause your tent to melt/burn and that you're okay. My friend and I have the same tent, but he opted for a different stove that has a stainless steel stove pipe. I have the same stovepipe you do, and I'm amazed at how much more fragile/malleable it is compared to the SS.

                Comment


                • #11
                  wonder what gauge titanium Winnerwell use on their pipes?

                  Comment


                  • #12
                    Originally posted by Bothwell Voyageur View Post
                    I think some campers are getting carried away with the length of their stove pipes, just saying...
                    How much clearance above the shelter would you recommend for a silnylon tipi? I've felt mine is much too long, but I've left it long for times when I dig out the interior of the tent. I've thought about cutting it down and carrying the extra length to make a splint in the field (secured with the keeper rings) just in case something like this happens. I've already done this with a short 1' piece of stainless steel stock around the section that contacts the stove jack for a little more strength in that area just in case a good gust of wind kinks it there.
                    Last edited by 4estTrekker; 01-13-2021, 02:19 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      Just my two bits:

                      Right now I am happy with about 7.5 ft. going vertical through the tent roof. If your set-up puts the pipe on the diagonal, I'd recommend an 8 ft pipe. Some folks believe that pipe length provides the draw that long cylinder of rising air creates, and the subsequent ability to burn sub-optimal wood....not to mention the jet turbine sound effect of combustion air being drawn in furiously!! With the big drawing power of a long pipe, you can always damp the stove down, but with a short pipe or a short rise on a diagonal pipe (and mediocre wood) you can't always turn up the heat.

                      But you asked about "clearance above the shelter". My experience with that is that you want at least 3 ft / 1 meter, or more. This height above the tent allows the pipe top to easily clear the tent peak, and can minimize the interference from unwanted air currents bouncing off the tent roof.

                      That said, many have found shorter set-ups to work just fine.

                      Comment


                      • #14
                        Spending some time trawling the internet produced a bit of information about stove pipes, though almost all the stuff that's out there relates to much bigger stoves and a lot of what's written is regarding larger permanent structures and how to stop effects of the internal air in the house causing a back draft.
                        From my understanding there is a "natural draft" due to air pushing harder on the bottom of the stove than on the top. The greater the difference in elevation between top and bottom the greater the pressure difference. It seems to be a linear effect. Once the stove is lit this is multiplied due to the increased temperature and lower pressure of the gas inside the pipe. The effects of the hot gas are about 4-5 times greater than the natural draft for most tent stoves from what I can see. This relies upon keeping the chimney gas hot, one of the benefits of a tall tipi with the pipe inside. Too much pipe outside and the smoke will cool and reduce the draw.
                        There does seem to be limit to how much benefit you can get from increasing the draw. Try to get the smoke to flow too fast and internal friction limits are met!

                        Comment


                        • #15
                          Hey BV,
                          Your research makes good sense to me. Thanks!
                          It would be neat to try to find the optimal pipe length, somehow, ....without cutting the pipe a little shorter, trying it, then cutting it a little shorter and trying it again, etc. That last cut will be when I realize that the pipe is now too short! I have a saw that cuts things shorter; I'd love to find a saw that cuts things longer!
                          Last edited by Undersky; 01-15-2021, 03:47 PM.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X