Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Down booties vs wool socks for sleeping?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Down booties vs wool socks for sleeping?

    Since I was a little kid keeping my feet warm has always been a struggle, finally in the last 12-15 years I think I'm getting my boots dialed in.
    But sleeping is still problematic. I wear heavy wool sock to bed, and often if it's fairly cold out I still have to wrap my feet in a jacket of some sort, which never stays in place as I toss and turn.
    I keep looking at down or apex booties, but....................... one, it seems like they will compress and not offer that much additional insulation, two, they are fairly expensive for something that is not that much fun....lol
    If I remember right all my quilts have a foot box, except my warmest weather one, so maybe that additional foot room might not compress the booties?

    Thoughts or opinions on sleeping in booties?
    Maybe they just need a more manly name, and I'd be more inclined to purchase a pair?........😀

  • #2
    We have Goosefeet Gear booties. They are very warm, usually worn over light wool socks. They are not snug on your feet like normal socks so maybe that helps maintain circulation. They’ve become an essential part of of gear.

    Comment


    • #3
      I have done both and come to the conclusion that my grandmother knew best- heat up water and throw a hot water bottle or two in the footbox of your sleeping bag. You can use original style Nalgene bottles too. Stick a bottle of very hot water in each boot liner at night before bed also if you don’t use a wood stove.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the info!
        If I'm using a wood stove and I happen to wake up in time I'll fill it, but most of the time I don't keep it going all night.
        I've tried the water bottle and it works ok, but kicking the bottle around all night bugs me, I guess I'm kind of a fussy sleeper now that I think about it....lol

        Comment


        • #5
          I have been diagnosed with Raynauds and spent several years struggling hard to keep my feet warm. I had multiple occasions of losing sensation in a toe or my feet for days. I no longer have issues while I am sleeping. Here are the things that I think help me.
          1. I use a sleeping bag/quilt that is reasonably matched to the temps and leave my core feeling warm. If my bag is not warm enough my body won't send heat to the feet.
          2. I ensure I am fully hydrated when I go to bed to ensure circulation is working at max. This means I have to get up 2-3 times a night (or use the "bottle") which is not great but better than numb feet. I do this by having a 2C soup course before dinner and 2C of hot coco as I am wrapping up. That adds 1L to what I was otherwise drinking and eating.
          3. Down booties!! I wear there in my sleeping bag. I have cheap ones but I had very nice ones before and they both have/had a textured rubberized sole that is fairly grippy on the snow but did not have any tread that can pick up snow. I wipe them clean before inserting my feet into my bag. Get them with the high collar/gaiter built in so you can walk around camp in them without worrying about snow over-toping.
          4. Ensure you have lose socks. Early on in my winter camping I had bitterly cold feet though my bag was plenty warm and I was hydrated. I couldn't sleep at all. I checked my feet to see if there was any frost nip I didn't find any but I was too tired to put my socks back on. To my surprise my feet warmed up. I now wear much loser heavy wool socks in camp and to bed.
          Last edited by timdaman; 11-14-2021, 08:39 PM. Reason: Added note about socks.

          Comment


          • #6
            Yes you have to stoke your core ‘fire’ before bedtime. Hot drinks as Timdaman said are good. I also always recommend eating a hearty helping of a pasta meal before getting into your bag as well- your body will burn those carbs all night to keep your core hot, sending the heat through your circulatory system to heat extremities. Also make sure your sleep system insulation is adequate- you make the heat, your system insulation is designed to keep it in, but too little you are cold, too much you are sweating....

            Comment


            • #7
              I sort of cheat. I really like liquid water in the AM so I heat water at night and fill my stainless canteen, toss it at the bottom and wear wool socks appropriate for the temperature.

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm in the wool camp but do put on a dry pair before calling it the night.
                I also go with make sure you have more sleeping bag or quilts than you need (that becomes a great back yard exercise in understanding ones gear) so your core stays toasty and keeps that warmth migrating to the extremities.

                Comment

                Working...
                X